Journalist? Blogger? Streamer or YouTuber? We want your insight!

Are you a games journalist, blogger, streamer or YouTuber? We’re looking for people who fall into that category – whether professionally or as a hobby – who can spare ten or fifteen minutes to complete a quick survey for us.

The survey – which can be completed anonymously – is about your experiences of interacting with game developers and PR people, as well as what sorts of things you’re looking to cover in 2019. We’ll use it to help improve the ways we work with you folks, and we’re also planning to use the data to help us compile a report, which we’ll release publicly (we won’t include any personally identifying information in the report unless you expressly give us permission to do so). read more

Why nobody cares about your indie game

We sometimes have clients come to us who have been running their own marketing for a while, but have hit a brick wall: they simply cannot get more than a handful of people interested in their game. Often, these clients are stumped, and at their wits’ end. They’ve tried everything, but nothing seems to work.

When you work on enough marketing projects (and I’d estimate I’ve publicised upwards of 200 games in some capacity over the years), you start to spot trends that make these issues a lot easier to diagnose and treat. Here are the top five reasons we find indies aren’t getting the attention their developers were hoping for – and how to steer things back on track for your game! read more

2018/19 trends in indie game marketing & PR

In many ways, 2018 has been a phenomenal year for indie games – with the likes of Return of the Obra Dinn, Guacamelee 2 and today’s GRIS rightly enthralling players. But it’s also been a very challenging year for a large number of indie developers, who have increasingly found it difficult to stand out from the crowd.

Over the year we’ve worked with around 20 different indie studios on more than 50 individual PR and marketing campaigns, and we’ve spotted some trends we think you should be aware of as we wrap up 2018 and head into the New Year. read more

Developing your PR standing as a game developer

A common source of disappointment we see among indie developers is the erroneous assumption that a PR campaign will instantly convert into top-tier coverage. The reality, however, is that being namechecked by the biggest outlet involves a complex and multi-staged process that takes time, energy, and an element of trial and error.

When an editor, journalist or influencer is deciding what to cover on a given day, there are two prerequisites that need to be hit. Number one: they need to know that product or company exists. Number two: they need to be confident that it will be of interest to their audience. read more

Indie game marketing: the most common mistakes, and how to avoid them

Last year, I wrote about the most common indie game PR mistakes, and how to avoid falling into those traps. More than ever, those tips remain true: it’s vital to have a clear proposition, allow enough time to prove your value to the media, and ensure everything you present is on-message and slickly produced. But good indie game marketing covers more than just PR, and we often see studios follow the rules when it comes to their public relations, yet fail to capitalise on this success due to having a less-than-robust overall marketing strategy. read more

How indie game marketing can benefit from open production

Recently, many games studios have thrown out old ways of making and marketing their games, and have embraced a bold, disruptive new approach: open production. But what is it? And is it right for you?

What is open production?

Traditionally, video games are made behind closed doors. Teams of designers and developers work away in secret, with information drip-fed to the public by PR and marketing teams, often building up to big reveals and impactful campaigns as the game heads towards launch. read more

How indie games can get the best marketing exposure at expos

Gamescom’s just wrapped up in Cologne, PAX heads to Seattle this weekend, and EGX and the Paris Games Week hit Birmingham and, uh, Paris respectively next month.

It’s that time of year where thousands of indie developers around the world head to expos to showcase their latest creation. But with booths at many such events costing thousands, if not tens of thousands, how can indies get the best bang for their buck?

Here are our five top tips – for getting the most out of your marketing, and more besides. read more

The importance of starting early

Once upon a time, releasing an indie game was enough to get people’s attention — especially if your game was on Steam, the holy grail for the indie developer looking to gain visibility with a large audience. There was a time when a Steam release would guarantee you millions of eyes on your game, and drive sales without you having to do anything. That fabled time now has a name: 2013.

It is not 2013 any more.

And as such, we hear from many developers who are about to release a game, and who know that they need to do some marketing to be in with a chance of success. The problem is, it takes time to construct a scenario where success is likely, or even possible. Developers who begin thinking about marketing just weeks before their release are shooting themselves in the foot, and instead engendering a situation in which their hard work is destined to fail. read more

Come say hi at the Develop Conference

Jon and I will both be at the Develop Conference in Brighton next week, where we hope to meet a bunch of lovely indie developers and natter away about marketing and PR until the seagulls come home.

I’ll also be doing a talk on the Wednesday morning. It’s free to attend! You’ll need to sign up for an Expo Pass (at the indie-friendly price of zero pounds) in order to gain entry.

The talk is about how to earn your place in the video games media, with a focus on the word ‘earn’. This isn’t about how to write a press release or how to email a journalist, but rather, about how to prove that you’re worth paying attention to, and provide value to the journalists and influencers you’re out to impress. read more

How to get the most out of your PR and marketing partner

If you’ve decided to work with a PR or marketing company or individual, you might be unsure as to the best way to work together. Some people talk about their desire to “outsource” their marketing to an external partner. But I’m not sure “outsourcing” is the most helpful way of looking at the relationship that exists behind a successful promotional campaign.

Where others might talk about “outsourcing” or call themselves a marketing “supplier”, we like to talk about “collaborations” — because at the heart of any great promotional relationship is a desire to work together to make great things happen. So if you decide to work with someone on your PR or marketing, here are five tips for making that magic happen. read more